The Forgery of Jesus’s Wife?

It’s looking more and more like the so-called Gospel of Jesus’s Wife is a forgery. Andrew Bernhard has discovered what appears to be evidence of a forger accidentally perpetuating a typo that first originated in an online edition of the Gospel of Thomas. His preliminary report is available at his website. More details are available here.

Even if the document isn’t a forgery, it is still wrought with problems. However, with so many key words like Mary, wife, and disciple all in an area smaller than a business card, the find does seem a little too good to be true for those trying to find evidence that Jesus was married. It seems that the scholarly community will soon reject it as a fraud.

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2 thoughts on “The Forgery of Jesus’s Wife?

  1. See: http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/05/13/half-of-new-testament-forged-bible-scholar-says/

    ““Forged” will help people accept something that it took him a long time to accept, says the author, a former fundamentalist who is now an agnostic.

    The New Testament wasn’t written by the finger of God, he says – it has human fingerprints all over its pages.

    “I’m not saying people should throw it out or it’s not theologically fruitful,” Ehrman says. “I’m saying that by realizing it contains so many forgeries, it shows that it’s a very human book, down to the fact that some authors lied about who they were.””

    Even if it turns out that this new text is a forgery, it will be just as good as any of the rest of the New Testament.

    • Ben Witherington calls Ehrman’s book “Gullible Travels, for it reveals over and over again the willingness of people to believe even outrageous things.” You can read his online critique here.

      Questioning the authorship of the NT epistles is nothing new. The German higher critics rejected just about all of Paul’s epistles back in the 1800s. Today, their methods have been rejected by most scholars, but if you’re willing to overlook a hundred years worth of rebuttal evidence, the claim makes for a great pop-theology book.

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